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Jeffrey V. Ravetch to receive 2018 Robert Koch Award

Ravetch receives the award for his groundbreaking work analyzing the immune system’s antibody response. He has worked for decades on the Fc fragment of the antibody molecule and its binding partners, known as Fc receptors.

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New method allows scientists to study how HIV persists

Scientists have developed a new strategy to study the cells that host hidden reserves of dormant HIV, a step that may lead to new treatments that go beyond controlling the infection and instead aim to eradicate the virus entirely.

Small molecule from Kapoor lab is accepted as first Bridge Medicines drug candidate

A chemical inhibitor targeting basal cell carcinoma, originating from Tarun Kapoor’s lab, is graduating from the Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute into Bridge Medicines.

From infection-dodging stem cells, new tactics for research on viral disease

Among other superpowers, stem cells have a knack for fending off viruses like dengue and zika. Scientists have gained new insight into these curious defense strategies—knowledge they say could fuel the development of drugs against a range of diseases.

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Structural studies help explain how cancer cells resist chemotherapy

New research sheds light on how some cancer cells use molecular pumps to expel chemotherapy drugs before they have a chance to work.

Astrophysicist Kip Thorne to receive Rockefeller’s 2018 science writing prize

Thorne is recognized for his deft explanations that have drawn readers into the space-, time-, and mind-bending realm of Einstein’s ideas. The prize, which honors scientists as inspirational authors, will be presented on April 17.

What happens to a dying cell’s corpse? New findings illuminate an old problem

Scientists have discovered a curious way for cells to die. In studying it, they are learning about how remnants of diseased cells are normally chewed up and removed.

Scientists map the portal to the cell’s nucleus

The gateway to cellular headquarters has 552 components. A new map that shows how all these pieces fit together could help scientists study numerous diseases.

Scientists caution that a rare childhood liver cancer can spread to the brain

A new report details three cases of secondary brain tumors in people with fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. The researchers say imaging tests could improve treatment for patients whose cancer spreads to the brain from the liver.

Molecular doorstop could be key to new tuberculosis drugs

In discovering how an antibiotic kills the bacteria that cause tuberculosis, scientists open the door to new treatments for the disease—and possibly others, as well.

Recent Awards and Honors

Laura Duvall Portrait

Laura Duvall receives Blavatnik Regional Award

September 4, 2019

Duvall, a research associate in the lab of Leslie B. Vosshall, is honored for her investigation of the mechanisms by which neuropeptides modulate mosquito behavior.

Carla Nasca and Liling Wan named Blavatnik Regional Award Finalists

September 4, 2019

Nasca, from Bruce S. McEwen’s lab, and Wan, from C. David Allis’ lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work in the life sciences category.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The Washington Post

A mathematical constant that is one of the keystones of chaos theory has been named for him: the Feigenbaum constant. It was revealed as part of his discovery of a powerful and detailed mathematical description of precisely how in a wide array of seemingly disparate systems, order breaks down and makes the transition to chaos.

NPR

"I really feel like I'm looking at one of the most mysterious aspect of our own existence," Brivanlou says. Brivanlou, Simunovic and their colleagues hope their creations will lead to fundamental discoveries that could have many implications, including a better understanding of the the origins of many diseases.

The New York Times

“It’s tempting to think marijuana is a harmless substance that poses no threat to teens and young adults. The medical facts, however, reveal a different reality.” —Mary Jeanne Kreek in an op-ed for The New York Times

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue looks deep into the brains of small critters and their decision-making processes. Also: how research on rare diseases could benefit us all, and much more.


From this issue

 

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