Skip to main content
!
Emergency notification: The campus is closed except to essential personnel and those conducting approved critical lab operations or approved COVID-19 research. Updates here.

First mapping of cells in the early human placenta to advance research on problem pregnancies

Scientists have made the first comprehensive inventory of cells present in the human placenta of the first trimester, a stage when many pregnancy complications are thought to arise. The findings could fuel new research on conditions such as preeclampsia and pre-term birth.

New method for studying gene expression could improve understanding of brain disease

By analyzing gene expression patterns, researchers have identified previously unknown distinctions between mouse and human neurons. They have also developed a new way to track cellular changes associated with brain disorders.

“Discoveries are delicate things”: What a century-old war can teach us about science today

In the 1910s, Rockefeller biochemist Israel Kleiner came close to discovering insulin, but missed his opportunity to find a much-needed treatment for diabetes. In a recent Harper’s Magazine essayneuroscientist Jeffrey M. Friedman explores the factors that set back Kleiner's work and their relevance for modern times.

Mosquito genome opens new avenues for reducing bug-borne disease

Researchers have assembled a new and improved DNA catalogue for the mosquito Aedes aegypti. This tool will help researchers understand the insect’s biology, and may lead to new strategies for preventing diseases like Zika and dengue.

Fundraising campaign surpasses goal two years ahead of schedule

Launched in 2011, the university’s Campaign for Transforming Biomedicine has raised $1.059 billion as of September 30 this year.

University updates policy on storm-related closures

Beginning this winter, Rockefeller will close during days that New York City public schools close due to weather emergencies.

Embryos remember the chemicals that they encounter

A new study shows that embryonic cells retain a memory of the chemical signals to which they are exposed. Without these memories, cells fail organize into distinct tissue types.

>

Enzyme structure helps to explain how protein factories are constructed

Researchers characterized the structure of Mdn1, an enzyme key to making ribosomes.

Searching in soil, scientists find a new way to combat tuberculosis

Analyzing soil samples from across the country, researchers have identified an antibiotic capable of treating strains of tuberculosis that do not respond to existing therapies.

More than 750 people visit campus during Open House New York

Rockefeller hosts historical and architectural tours as part of Open House New York, a citywide festival that puts on display buildings and spaces not usually open to the public.

Recent Awards and Honors

Albert J. Libchaber

Albert J. Libchaber named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

November 26, 2019

Libchaber is recognized for his contributions to the field of experimental condensed matter physics.

Two Rockefeller Scientists honored with NIH Director’s Awards

October 1, 2019

Brian T. Chait and Erich D. Jarvis received the NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award for high-risk, high-reward research. Read more about the awards here.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The Washington Post

Jean-Laurent Casanova, an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and physician at Rockefeller University Hospital, suspects vulnerability to the virus among some young people may be partly encoded in their DNA.

The Washington Post

Rockefeller University immunologist Michel Nussenzweig and his colleagues launched a study of people who have recovered from coronavirus infections this month — a study that also focuses on antibodies.

The New York Times

A neuroscientist, Bruce McEwen showed how an unrelenting barrage of stress hormones can break down the body, leading to disease, depression, obesity and more.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 

Instagram


Subscribe to Rockefeller Science News

Did you know Rockefeller has a monthly science newsletter? Subscribe now to stay on top of the latest discoveries, news updates, and science highlights from Rockefeller’s laboratories and researchers.