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Researchers discover a weakness in a rare cancer that could be exploited with drugs

Researchers have identified a rare type of cancer cell that cannot make cholesterol, a key nutrient. By targeting this deficiency, scientists may be able to develop new strategies for treating the disease.

New online resource brings science outreach to a broader audience

With the launch of a new website, RockEDU Online, more resources are now available for learners, educators, and scientists everywhere.

New findings could make mosquitoes more satisfied—and safer to be around

Scientists have learned new tricks that could be useful in preventing mosquito-borne illnesses such as Zika and yellow fever. A new study shows that some appetite-reducing drugs can curtail the insects’ impulse to feed on warm-blooded hosts.

Lysin therapy offers new hope for fighting drug-resistant bacteria

Increasingly, bacteria do not succumb to antibiotics. Rockefeller researchers have developed a new class of antimicrobial drug, lysin, with one compound showing promising results in a clinical trial—suggesting that an alternative to antibiotics may be on the horizon.

Daniel Kronauer discusses “The Social Lives of Ants” at this year’s Talking science event

More than 350 high school students from across the tri-state area attended this year’s event where Kronauer shared how ants can help answer questions about the principles that govern life.

An end in sight 

Medical science is holding its breath. For decades, the most it could do for people with HIV was to prevent them from dying of AIDS. Now, new therapies are raising hopes for something more: a world in which the virus will no longer cause suffering or fear.

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In simple bacteria, scientists find new evidence of complex immunity

Bacteria use a multifaceted immune response to get rid of invading DNA. In a new study, researchers identify an enzyme that can destroy foreign genetic material capable of evading a microbe’s first line of defense.

Tri-institutional symposium inspires young scientists to get involved in policy

Over 230 attendees from across the country came to campus to learn about a range of topics, such as the federal budget, international science diplomacy, science advocacy, science communication, and careers in science policy.

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Jeffrey M. Friedman to receive the 2019 Wolf Prize in Medicine

Friedman receives the award for his discovery of leptin, a hormone that modulates food intake and energy expenditure.

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Enzyme structure reveals how DNA is opened up for transcription

DNA’s two strands must be separated before its code can be read, or transcribed. By studying the structure of the enzyme RNA polymerase, researchers have elucidated how DNA unwinds and becomes legible.

Recent Awards and Honors

Albert J. Libchaber

Albert J. Libchaber named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

November 26, 2019

Libchaber is recognized for his contributions to the field of experimental condensed matter physics.

Two Rockefeller Scientists honored with NIH Director’s Awards

October 1, 2019

Brian T. Chait and Erich D. Jarvis received the NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award for high-risk, high-reward research. Read more about the awards here.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

Scientific American

"What we do know tells us that if you are thin, you should thank your 'lean' genes and refrain from stigmatizing the obese. A broad acceptance of the biologic basis of obesity would not only be fair but would allow us to collectively focus on health." -Jeff Friedman

The New York Times

Conventional antibiotics do not distinguish between good and bad bacteria, eradicating everything indiscriminately and occasionally creating problems for people with weakened immune systems.

“A major benefit of Crispr is that we can program it to kill only specific pathogenic bacteria and leave alone the rest of our healthy microbes,” Dr. Marraffini said.

STAT News

Fortuitously, or perhaps by design, creativity has been a guiding principle for Ruta, 45, and her work. Both her parents were visual artists, and Ruta herself grew up as a ballet dancer — and at one point considered it a career path.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue looks deep into the brains of small critters and their decision-making processes. Also: how research on rare diseases could benefit us all, and much more.


From this issue

 

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