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Researchers discover a common link among diverse cancer types

Some cancers have been traced to changes in histones, proteins responsible for packaging DNA and regulating genes. Now, research from Rockefeller scientists shows that, among tumors, mutations to these proteins are a lot more common than previously suspected.

The face-recognition puzzle 

For the brain, seeing a face is very different from seeing a teacup. In studying a mysterious ailment, face blindness, scientists are getting a rare glimpse into the biology of the mind.

Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center will end 23-year affiliation with Rockefeller

A move to Columbia University will provide a new home for ADARC, which for many years has occupied laboratories in a city-owned building on First Avenue.

Rockefeller reaches key milestone in River Campus project

The temporary certificate of occupancy from the New York City Department of Buildings is a close-to-last step in the expansion of the university’s campus over the FDR Drive.

David C. Gadsby, who studied electrical impulses in cells, dies

Gadsby, who passed away Saturday at age 71, was best known for his studies determining the mechanisms by which charged particles called ions move across cell membranes.

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Scientists find new clues about how the body stores fat

Scientists discovered a protein that plays a crucial role in regulating fatty acids, the molecules that make up body fat. This research could lead to new options for treating people with diseases associated with fatty acid buildup.

Scientists identify genetic factors that may cause some people to become obese

New research on leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite, reveals a previously unknown mechanism that may be responsible for at least 10 percent of obesity cases. The findings could help identify individuals with treatable forms of the condition.

Inside the brains of hungry worms, researchers find clues about how they hunt

When looking for food, the roundworm C. elegans searches the same area for up to 20 minutes before trying its luck at more distant locales. New research on the worm’s brain explains how this behavior arises at the level of molecules and cells.

The long-neglected culprit of Alzheimer’s 

Despite decades of study, we know surprisingly little about why neurons fail and memories fade. One researcher is finding clues where few others have looked—in the brain’s blood chemistry.

Fall search for new faculty has yielded 10 finalists

The annual “open search” process for tenure-track faculty draws on the expertise of the entire university community.

Recent Awards and Honors

Albert J. Libchaber

Albert J. Libchaber named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

November 26, 2019

Libchaber is recognized for his contributions to the field of experimental condensed matter physics.

Two Rockefeller Scientists honored with NIH Director’s Awards

October 1, 2019

Brian T. Chait and Erich D. Jarvis received the NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award for high-risk, high-reward research. Read more about the awards here.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

Scientific American

"What we do know tells us that if you are thin, you should thank your 'lean' genes and refrain from stigmatizing the obese. A broad acceptance of the biologic basis of obesity would not only be fair but would allow us to collectively focus on health." -Jeff Friedman

The New York Times

Conventional antibiotics do not distinguish between good and bad bacteria, eradicating everything indiscriminately and occasionally creating problems for people with weakened immune systems.

“A major benefit of Crispr is that we can program it to kill only specific pathogenic bacteria and leave alone the rest of our healthy microbes,” Dr. Marraffini said.

STAT News

Fortuitously, or perhaps by design, creativity has been a guiding principle for Ruta, 45, and her work. Both her parents were visual artists, and Ruta herself grew up as a ballet dancer — and at one point considered it a career path.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue looks deep into the brains of small critters and their decision-making processes. Also: how research on rare diseases could benefit us all, and much more.


From this issue

 

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