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New compounds could be used to treat autoimmune disorders

In autoimmune disorders, the body’s defense system erroneously attacks normal cells, leading to serious health problems. Researchers have developed new molecules that potentially could be used to treat many of these conditions.

New study reveals gut segments organized by function, and opportunities for better drug design

New findings provide insights about how the intestine maximizes nutrient uptake, while at the same time protecting the body from potentially dangerous microbes.

An accreditation renewal, and the campus-wide endeavor to ensure continued safeguarding of research participants

Rockefeller's reaccreditation from the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs marks the end of an extensive application process. The AAHRPP sets the gold standard in safeguarding volunteers participating in clinical research.

A new sculpture, donated by Torsten N. Wiesel, is perched in front of Flexner Hall

The cast-iron parrot is an architectural ornament from the late 19th or early 20th century.

Cellular rivalry promotes healthy skin development

Scientists have discovered a curious phenomenon taking place in mouse skin: cells compete with one another for the chance to develop into mature tissue. The findings indicate that this antagonism is key to creating healthy skin.

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Researchers find genetic link to tuberculosis

Rockefeller scientists have identified a genetic condition that makes people prone to developing tuberculosis. In a British population, they found that the condition underlies one percent of cases of the disease—a finding that may ultimately lead to new treatment options.

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Study explores genetic differences among people’s gut microbes, and their health consequences

Scientists have found that small genetic differences can cause the same gut microbe to behave differently in different people, and affect the overall health of their human hosts.

Research on repetitive worm behavior may have implications for understanding human disease

Studying microscopic worms, Rockefeller scientists have identified a brain circuit that drives repetitive behavior—providing potential clues for understanding some human psychiatric conditions.

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Jue Chen and Luciano Marraffini elected to National Academy of Sciences

Election to the National Academy of Sciences is one of the most prestigious honors a scientist can receive; including Chen and Marraffini, the number of current Rockefeller scientists who are members of the elite organization stands at 38, or nearly half the faculty.

Drugs from dirt 

Therapeutics has gone underground. From one bag of soil, chemists can now procure millions of microbial molecules. Any one could be tomorrow’s lifesaving medicine.

Recent Awards and Honors

Albert J. Libchaber

Albert J. Libchaber named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

November 26, 2019

Libchaber is recognized for his contributions to the field of experimental condensed matter physics.

Two Rockefeller Scientists honored with NIH Director’s Awards

October 1, 2019

Brian T. Chait and Erich D. Jarvis received the NIH Director’s Transformative Research Award for high-risk, high-reward research. Read more about the awards here.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

Scientific American

"What we do know tells us that if you are thin, you should thank your 'lean' genes and refrain from stigmatizing the obese. A broad acceptance of the biologic basis of obesity would not only be fair but would allow us to collectively focus on health." -Jeff Friedman

The New York Times

Conventional antibiotics do not distinguish between good and bad bacteria, eradicating everything indiscriminately and occasionally creating problems for people with weakened immune systems.

“A major benefit of Crispr is that we can program it to kill only specific pathogenic bacteria and leave alone the rest of our healthy microbes,” Dr. Marraffini said.

STAT News

Fortuitously, or perhaps by design, creativity has been a guiding principle for Ruta, 45, and her work. Both her parents were visual artists, and Ruta herself grew up as a ballet dancer — and at one point considered it a career path.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue looks deep into the brains of small critters and their decision-making processes. Also: how research on rare diseases could benefit us all, and much more.


From this issue

 

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