Skip to main content
!
Phase III Operations: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

Third Rockefeller cryo-EM to help tame poorly behaved proteins

With a new transmission cryo-electron microscope, Rockefeller researchers will be prepared to sleuth out complicated protein structures in increasingly sophisticated ways.

Ant-y social: study of clonal raider ants reveals the evolutionary benefits of group living

A new study in ants demonstrates that living in groups leads to improved fitness. The researchers show that, in larger groups, ants take on specialized roles and colony stability increases.

New faculty member studies the architecture of the genome

Risca explores the three-dimensional structures that organize and support DNA, and the biochemical rules that govern the organization of the genome. She will join Rockefeller as an assistant professor on January 2, 2019.

Structure of ion channel reveals how insects smell their way around the world

Researchers describe, for the first time, the structure of a smell-receptor protein common among insects. Its inner architecture illuminates how insects evolved to detect an amazing diversity of odors.

Researchers uncover molecular mechanisms of rare skin disease

Scientists describe a group of proteins that protect cells from a subtype of human papilloma virus. They also outline genetic mutations that make this virus unusually harmful in people with epidermodysplasia verruciformis, a rare skin condition.

Lack of a single molecule may indicate severe and treatment-resistant depression

Researchers find that a deficiency of acetyl-L-carnitine is associated with a particular subtype of depression. Individuals with very low levels of this molecule often have highly severe symptoms and don’t respond to traditional antidepressants.

Ant study sheds light on the evolution of workers and queens

A new study in ants identifies a peptide that plays an important role in regulating reproduction. This research illuminates a potential trajectory for the evolution of distinct social castes—workers and queens.

Giant neurons in the brain may play similarly giant role in awareness and cognition

Scientists find that certain neurons release nitric oxide onto nearby blood vessels, and potentially use this mechanism to control awareness in the brain.

Erich Jarvis receives grant from W.M. Keck foundation

With a new grant from the W.M. Keck foundation, the Jarvis Lab will further their research on the genes and neural circuits involved in speech production.

Studies reveal possible origin of human speech

Scientists have long debated the evolutionary origins of human speech. New research reveals neural circuits in the brains of monkeys that may represent the source of our unique speech capabilities.

Recent Awards and Honors

Alexander Meeske

Alexander Meeske receives Tri-Institutional Breakout Award

June 11, 2020

A postdoctoral fellow in lab of Luciano Marraffini, Meeske is honored for his research on how bacteria cope with stresses in their environment.

Albert J. Libchaber

Albert J. Libchaber named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

November 26, 2019

Libchaber is recognized for his contributions to the field of experimental condensed matter physics.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

NIH Director's Blog

The findings from the Nussenzweig lab help not only to understand the immune response to COVID-19, they are also critical for vaccine design, revealing what a strong neutralizing antibody for SARS-CoV-2 should look like to help the immune system win.

The Scientist

Erich Jarvis on what we can and must do to make science more equitable.

Scientific American

As drug-resistant superbugs spread, Vincent Fischetti and others are turning to microbes that kill bacteria. At a time when much of the world is besieged by a virus, it's good to know that these tiny invaders may someday save us.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 


Subscribe to Rockefeller Science News

Did you know Rockefeller has a monthly science newsletter? Subscribe now to stay on top of the latest discoveries, news updates, and science highlights from Rockefeller’s laboratories and researchers.