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Scientists find new clues about how the body stores fat

Scientists discovered a protein that plays a crucial role in regulating fatty acids, the molecules that make up body fat. This research could lead to new options for treating people with diseases associated with fatty acid buildup.

Scientists identify genetic factors that may cause some people to become obese

New research on leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite, reveals a previously unknown mechanism that may be responsible for at least 10 percent of obesity cases. The findings could help identify individuals with treatable forms of the condition.

Inside the brains of hungry worms, researchers find clues about how they hunt

When looking for food, the roundworm C. elegans searches the same area for up to 20 minutes before trying its luck at more distant locales. New research on the worm’s brain explains how this behavior arises at the level of molecules and cells.

The long-neglected culprit of Alzheimer's 

Despite decades of study, we know surprisingly little about why neurons fail and memories fade. One researcher is finding clues where few others have looked—in the brain’s blood chemistry.

Fall search for new faculty has yielded 10 finalists

The annual “open search” process for tenure-track faculty draws on the expertise of the entire university community.

Researchers discover a weakness in a rare cancer that could be exploited with drugs

Researchers have identified a rare type of cancer cell that cannot make cholesterol, a key nutrient. By targeting this deficiency, scientists may be able to develop new strategies for treating the disease.

New online resource brings science outreach to a broader audience

With the launch of a new website, RockEDU Online, more resources are now available for learners, educators, and scientists everywhere.

New findings could make mosquitoes more satisfied—and safer to be around

Scientists have learned new tricks that could be useful in preventing mosquito-borne illnesses such as Zika and yellow fever. A new study shows that some appetite-reducing drugs can curtail the insects’ impulse to feed on warm-blooded hosts.

Lysin therapy offers new hope for fighting drug-resistant bacteria

Increasingly, bacteria do not succumb to antibiotics. Rockefeller researchers have developed a new class of antimicrobial drug, lysin, with one compound showing promising results in a clinical trial—suggesting that an alternative to antibiotics may be on the horizon.

Daniel Kronauer discusses “The Social Lives of Ants” at this year’s Talking science event

More than 350 high school students from across the tri-state area attended this year’s event where Kronauer shared how ants can help answer questions about the principles that govern life.

Recent Awards and Honors

LLuciano Marraffini portrait

Luciano Marraffini awarded Max Planck-Humboldt Medal

October 14, 2020

Marraffini receives the award for his achievements studying CRISPR-Cas, a bacterial immune mechanism whose discovery led to modern gene-editing tools.

Amelia Escolano and Marc Schneeberger Pané named Blavatnik Regional Award Finalists

September 23, 2020

Escolano, from Michel C. Nussenzweig’s lab, and Schneeberger Pané, from Jeffrey M. Friedman’s lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work in the life sciences category.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

CNN

"The vast majority of antibiotics we use today come from growing bacteria out of soil," said Sean Brady, a chemical biologist and professor at The Rockefeller University in New York City. Though we came up with ways to make them ourselves, it was in dirt that these antibiotics were first discovered.

NIH Director's Blog

Two studies from Jean-Laurent Casanova suggest that one reason some otherwise healthy people become gravely ill may be previously unknown trouble spots in their immune systems, which hamper their ability to fight the virus.

The Washington Post

“We’re all a few in a cast of thousands,” Charles Rice said. “I feel a little bit odd — a combination of humbled and embarrassed. I think there are many people who should feel very good about what they contributed today.”

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 


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