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Rockefeller reaches key milestone in River Campus project

The temporary certificate of occupancy from the New York City Department of Buildings is a close-to-last step in the expansion of the university’s campus over the FDR Drive.

David C. Gadsby, who studied electrical impulses in cells, dies

Gadsby, who passed away Saturday at age 71, was best known for his studies determining the mechanisms by which charged particles called ions move across cell membranes.

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Scientists find new clues about how the body stores fat

Scientists discovered a protein that plays a crucial role in regulating fatty acids, the molecules that make up body fat. This research could lead to new options for treating people with diseases associated with fatty acid buildup.

Scientists identify genetic factors that may cause some people to become obese

New research on leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite, reveals a previously unknown mechanism that may be responsible for at least 10 percent of obesity cases. The findings could help identify individuals with treatable forms of the condition.

Inside the brains of hungry worms, researchers find clues about how they hunt

When looking for food, the roundworm C. elegans searches the same area for up to 20 minutes before trying its luck at more distant locales. New research on the worm’s brain explains how this behavior arises at the level of molecules and cells.

The long-neglected culprit of Alzheimer's 

Despite decades of study, we know surprisingly little about why neurons fail and memories fade. One researcher is finding clues where few others have looked—in the brain’s blood chemistry.

Fall search for new faculty has yielded 10 finalists

The annual “open search” process for tenure-track faculty draws on the expertise of the entire university community.

Researchers discover a weakness in a rare cancer that could be exploited with drugs

Researchers have identified a rare type of cancer cell that cannot make cholesterol, a key nutrient. By targeting this deficiency, scientists may be able to develop new strategies for treating the disease.

New online resource brings science outreach to a broader audience

With the launch of a new website, RockEDU Online, more resources are now available for learners, educators, and scientists everywhere.

New findings could make mosquitoes more satisfied—and safer to be around

Scientists have learned new tricks that could be useful in preventing mosquito-borne illnesses such as Zika and yellow fever. A new study shows that some appetite-reducing drugs can curtail the insects’ impulse to feed on warm-blooded hosts.

Recent Awards and Honors

Amelia Escolano and Marc Schneeberger Pané named Blavatnik Regional Award Finalists

September 23, 2020

Escolano, from Michel C. Nussenzweig’s lab, and Schneeberger Pané, from Jeffrey M. Friedman’s lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work in the life sciences category.

Li Zhao portrait

Li Zhao named a Vallee Scholar

August 12, 2020

Zhao receives the honor for her research on how novel genes arise.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

The Wall Street Journal

“The immune system in people is as diverse as beauty, height, intelligence and any other human feature,” said molecular immunologist Michel Nussenzweig at Rockefeller University in New York. “Not everybody is the same in their ability to fight infection.”

The Guardian

Clinical use of heritable genome editing should not be considered until it's established that precise genomic changes can be made reliably without introducing undesired changes, according to a joint NAS, NAM, and Royal Society commission co-chaired by Rockefeller president Richard P. Lifton.

The Washington Post

A study from the laboratory of Leslie Vosshall, a Rockefeller University Robin Chemers Neustein professor, shows that by giving mosquitoes the minimal components of the blood meal and adding a special drug, the insects will eat and later stop biting.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 


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