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Phase III+: The University is open for expanded research operations; only authorized personnel will be admitted on campus. More info here.

The future of TB is TBD 

Deadly and elusive, M. tuberculosis has ravaged the world for centuries. Armed with new technologies to study the pathogen, scientists may finally be poised to intervene.

The River Campus is open for business

After four years of construction, the Stavros Niarchos Foundation–David Rockefeller River Campus has opened its doors to the community, with several labs already installed in its new research building.

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New molecular diagnostics test could help guide lupus treatments

A tool that detects glitches in gene expression could help doctors tailor treatments for lupus-related kidney damage.

Rockefeller tops global ranking of research excellence

An extensive international ranking of research institutions by U-Multirank gave Rockefeller top scores in several categories related to scientific impact and knowledge transfer.

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New research shows that mosquitoes sense repellent through their legs

Scientists made the surprising discovery that the insects’ displeasure for touching DEET, the active ingredient in many repellents, helps prevent bites.

Small brains, big decisions 

Life is full of binary choices, even for small animals like fruit flies. With new technologies, scientists can now dissect the mechanisms of decision making in the simplest of brains, at the levels of individual molecules, cells, and networks.

To curb infection, bacteria direct their defenses against themselves

To fight off invading viruses, bacteria have evolved a slew of creative defense tactics. New research shows that in some cases, microbes go to great lengths to keep an infection from spreading, even destroying bits of their own genetic material.

New compounds could be used to treat autoimmune disorders

In autoimmune disorders, the body’s defense system erroneously attacks normal cells, leading to serious health problems. Researchers have developed new molecules that potentially could be used to treat many of these conditions.

New study reveals gut segments organized by function, and opportunities for better drug design

New findings provide insights about how the intestine maximizes nutrient uptake, while at the same time protecting the body from potentially dangerous microbes.

An accreditation renewal, and the campus-wide endeavor to ensure continued safeguarding of research participants

Rockefeller's reaccreditation from the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs marks the end of an extensive application process. The AAHRPP sets the gold standard in safeguarding volunteers participating in clinical research.

Recent Awards and Honors

Amelia Escolano and Marc Schneeberger Pané named Blavatnik Regional Award Finalists

September 23, 2020

Escolano, from Michel C. Nussenzweig’s lab, and Schneeberger Pané, from Jeffrey M. Friedman’s lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work in the life sciences category.

Li Zhao portrait

Li Zhao named a Vallee Scholar

August 12, 2020

Zhao receives the honor for her research on how novel genes arise.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

Science Magazine

Two studies from Jean-Laurent Casanova reveal that in a significant minority of patients with serious COVID-19, the interferon response has been crippled by genetic flaws or by rogue antibodies that attack interferon itself.

The Wall Street Journal

“The immune system in people is as diverse as beauty, height, intelligence and any other human feature,” said molecular immunologist Michel Nussenzweig at Rockefeller University in New York. “Not everybody is the same in their ability to fight infection.”

The Guardian

Clinical use of heritable genome editing should not be considered until it's established that precise genomic changes can be made reliably without introducing undesired changes, according to a joint NAS, NAM, and Royal Society commission co-chaired by Rockefeller president Richard P. Lifton.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 


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