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Ant-y social: study of clonal raider ants reveals the evolutionary benefits of group living

A new study in ants demonstrates that living in groups leads to improved fitness. The researchers show that, in larger groups, ants take on specialized roles and colony stability increases.

New faculty member studies the architecture of the genome

Risca explores the three-dimensional structures that organize and support DNA, and the biochemical rules that govern the organization of the genome. She will join Rockefeller as an assistant professor on January 2, 2019.

Structure of ion channel reveals how insects smell their way around the world

Researchers describe, for the first time, the structure of a smell-receptor protein common among insects. Its inner architecture illuminates how insects evolved to detect an amazing diversity of odors.

Researchers uncover molecular mechanisms of rare skin disease

Scientists describe a group of proteins that protect cells from a subtype of human papilloma virus. They also outline genetic mutations that make this virus unusually harmful in people with epidermodysplasia verruciformis, a rare skin condition.

Lack of a single molecule may indicate severe and treatment-resistant depression

Researchers find that a deficiency of acetyl-L-carnitine is associated with a particular subtype of depression. Individuals with very low levels of this molecule often have highly severe symptoms and don’t respond to traditional antidepressants.

Ant study sheds light on the evolution of workers and queens

A new study in ants identifies a peptide that plays an important role in regulating reproduction. This research illuminates a potential trajectory for the evolution of distinct social castes—workers and queens.

Giant neurons in the brain may play similarly giant role in awareness and cognition

Scientists find that certain neurons release nitric oxide onto nearby blood vessels, and potentially use this mechanism to control awareness in the brain.

Erich Jarvis receives grant from W.M. Keck foundation

With a new grant from the W.M. Keck foundation, the Jarvis Lab will further their research on the genes and neural circuits involved in speech production.

Studies reveal possible origin of human speech

Scientists have long debated the evolutionary origins of human speech. New research reveals neural circuits in the brains of monkeys that may represent the source of our unique speech capabilities.

Scientists discover a mechanism of drug resistance in breast and ovarian cancer

A new study helps explain why certain cancers don't respond to treatment, and offers hope for overcoming this deadly resistance.

Recent Awards and Honors

Gabriel Victora

Gabriel D. Victora named a 2019 Pew-Stewart Scholar for Cancer Research

June 14, 2019

Victora receives the award for work characterizing the dynamic interactions between different immune cell types as cancers develop.

Laura Duvall Portrait

Laura Duvall receives Tri-Institutional Breakout Award

June 12, 2019

Duvall, a research associate in lab of Leslie B. Vosshall, is honored for her investigation of the mechanisms by which neuropeptides modulate mosquito behavior.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

NPR

Orco mutants don't smell DEET and will fly toward even the most DEET-steeped human, according to Vosshall. But once they land, they immediately fly away. "Not only that, but if you look deeply into their mosquito eyes, which I do all the time, it really seems like they're really freaked out," she says. This observation suggested to the researchers that mosquitoes taste DEET upon contact, either with their mouthparts or with their feet.

The New York Times

“Everything that we do, everything we experience, can influence our physiology and change circuits in our brain in ways that make us more or less reactive to stress,” says Bruce McEwen, head of the Harold and Margaret Milliken Hatch Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology at The Rockefeller University.

The New York Times

Paul Greengard, an American neuroscientist whose quest to understand how brain cells communicate provided new insights into psychological diseases and earned him a Nobel Prize, and who used his entire $400,000 award to create an academic prize in memory of the mother he never knew, died on Saturday in Manhattan. He was 93.

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue looks deep into the brains of small critters and their decision-making processes. Also: how research on rare diseases could benefit us all, and much more.


From this issue

 

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