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How antibodies from llamas may lead to COVID-19 treatment

Llamas make antibodies that are much smaller than their human counterparts, yet still potent. Scientists hope that future drugs based on these molecules could provide new weapons against SARS-CoV-2.

Rockefeller leads global university ranking in measure of top cited publications

An international ranking of research institutions by U-Multirank placed Rockefeller first in the United States among 227 universities, and first internationally in a measure of its impact based on citations.

Brain study finds a molecular “off” switch for nicotine craving

In findings that might lead to better smoking-cessation tools, scientists have shown that manipulating a specific brain receptor can alter a mouse’s nicotine sensitivity.
 

Rockefeller’s 62nd Convocation to be held virtually this week

The spirit of the occasion will be preserved as this year’s usual in-person event is replaced with a virtual ceremony.

Rockefeller statement calls for justice and inclusivity in the United States

Read the Office of the President’s message to the campus community.

Unique mutation reveals a new role for well-known DNA-repair gene

The discovery of a rare mutation in BRCA2, commonly known as the breast cancer gene, has shed new light on how cells safeguard their genetic material.
 

Study reveals first evidence inherited genetics can drive cancer’s spread

Scientists have long struggled to understand what drives a tumor to seed itself elsewhere in the body. New research implicates our own pre-existing genetics.

Rockefeller scientists investigate life-threatening inflammation affecting children with COVID-19

The condition resembles a rare childhood illness, Kawasaki disease. Researchers are analyzing blood samples to find genetic clues to what might be causing it.

Mice with patchy coats lay bare how stem cells endure

Scientists have discovered how stem cells in the skin maintain their ability to replenish themselves, a process critical for hair growth. The findings suggest that errors in stem cell maintenance might contribute to permanent hair-loss conditions.

The gene hunt to explain why some young, healthy people die from COVID-19

People under 50 without preexisting conditions typically develop mild symptoms of coronavirus infection—but there are exceptions. Researchers are working to identify rare genetic variations that may explain why some in this group have succumbed to the disease.

Recent Awards and Honors

LLuciano Marraffini portrait

Luciano Marraffini awarded Max Planck-Humboldt Medal

October 14, 2020

Marraffini receives the award for his achievements studying CRISPR-Cas, a bacterial immune mechanism whose discovery led to modern gene-editing tools.

Amelia Escolano and Marc Schneeberger Pané named Blavatnik Regional Award Finalists

September 23, 2020

Escolano, from Michel C. Nussenzweig’s lab, and Schneeberger Pané, from Jeffrey M. Friedman’s lab, are recognized for their respective postdoctoral work in the life sciences category.

More awards and honors

Rockefeller in the News

CNN

"The vast majority of antibiotics we use today come from growing bacteria out of soil," said Sean Brady, a chemical biologist and professor at The Rockefeller University in New York City. Though we came up with ways to make them ourselves, it was in dirt that these antibiotics were first discovered.

NIH Director's Blog

Two studies from Jean-Laurent Casanova suggest that one reason some otherwise healthy people become gravely ill may be previously unknown trouble spots in their immune systems, which hamper their ability to fight the virus.

The Washington Post

“We’re all a few in a cast of thousands,” Charles Rice said. “I feel a little bit odd — a combination of humbled and embarrassed. I think there are many people who should feel very good about what they contributed today.”

Seek magazine

Rockefeller’s flagship publication is interested not just in scientific results, but in the people, ideas, and conversations that ignite discovery. The latest issue takes a look at how cells and molecules are being stretched, tugged at, prodded—and what we might learn about life by studying the physics of it. Also: How to starve a tumor, and much more.


From this issue

 


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